Category Archives: Kata Class

Current kata-of-the-month: Jitte

We are now studying Jitte (十手) in our Saturday classes. Jitte is also sometimes written as “Jutte.” The characters used are those for 10 (“Ju”: 十) and hand(s) (“Te” : 手). This could imply that we have the ability to fight off 10 opponents. But it could also have something to do with the defensive […]

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Next Kata for Saturday Kata Class: Heian Yondan

This Saturday we are doing Heian Yondan (平安四段), the fourth kata in our regular syllabus. The Heian kata came to Japan from Okinawa, where Funakoshi Sensei gave them their Japanese name. Heian means “peace and safety.” These kata were developed from the advanced kata to play the same role we use them for today: as a gateway […]

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Saturday Kata Class: Heian Sandan

In our basic kata classes on Saturday mornings, we are now on Heian Sandan (平安三段), the third kata in our regular syllabus. The Heian kata came to Japan from Okinawa, where Funakoshi Sensei gave them their Japanese name. Heian means “peace and safety.” These kata were developed from the advanced kata to play the same role we use them for today: as a […]

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Next Kata for Saturday Kata Class: Heian Nidan

In our weekly basic kata class on Saturday mornings, we are now practicing the kata Heian Nidan (平安二段), the second kata in our regular syllabus. The Heian kata came to Japan from Okinawa, where Funakoshi Sensei gave them their Japanese name. Heian means “peace and safety.” These kata were developed from the advanced kata to play the same role we use them for today: […]

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Saturday Kata Class

On Saturday, October 24th we’re looking forward to concluding several weeks of Unsu. This puts us at the end of our cycle of usual syllabus kata. Before we start again with the beginning kata for two weeks we’ll take the opportunity to practice some kata we don’t usually get to spend a lot of time on. […]

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Current Kata for Saturday Morning Kata Class: Hangetsu

Our current kata-of-the-month is Hangetsu (半月). The kata name means “Half Moon,” which refers to the way we step in the kata’s signature stance, hangetsu-dachi. In contrast to fudo-dachi we used in Sochin, with Hangetsu we practice gripping the floor and connecting with an inward squeeze in hangetsu-dachi and neko-ashi-dachi. You can see good examples of Hangetsu performed by Osaka Sensei here and by Kanazawa Sensei here. And […]

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